Unknown,  Detail of The Dragon Hurls Water after the Woman Clothed in the Sun, English, probably London, about 1255 - 1260, Tempera colors, gold leaf, and colored washes on parchment, J. Paul Getty Museum
 

Angry that the woman is escaping, “the serpent cast out of its mouth water like a river, after the woman, so that it might cause her to be carried away by the river.” (Apocalypse 12:15) In the miniature, only the bottom of the woman’s dress, her feet, and the edge of one wing are visible as she flies away just in time, beyond the space of the miniature’s frame. According to the text, the earth itself helps the woman by absorbing much of the water. (x)

Unknown,  Detail of The Dragon Hurls Water after the Woman Clothed in the Sun, English, probably London, about 1255 - 1260, Tempera colors, gold leaf, and colored washes on parchment, J. Paul Getty Museum

 

Angry that the woman is escaping, “the serpent cast out of its mouth water like a river, after the woman, so that it might cause her to be carried away by the river.” (Apocalypse 12:15) In the miniature, only the bottom of the woman’s dress, her feet, and the edge of one wing are visible as she flies away just in time, beyond the space of the miniature’s frame. According to the text, the earth itself helps the woman by absorbing much of the water. (x)

la-petite-fille-de-loup:

There was once a king and queen, rulers of an unnamed city, who had three daughters of conspicuous beauty. The youngest and most beautiful was Psyche, whose admirers went so far as to neglect the proper worship of the love goddess, Venus, and instead prayed and made offerings to her. It was rumored that she was the second coming of Venus, or the daughter of Venus from an unseemly union of the goddess and a mortal. Venus is offended, and commissions Cupid to work her revenge. Cupid, however, falls in love with the girl and desires to possess her for himself.